How to level up: master the craft of writing
Benefits for loving the craft of writing
You get paid more.
Seriously you will!
You’re able to rationalise, point out the benefits and inherent value in your client's service, your ideas and yourself.

You get paid more. You’re able to rationalise, point out the benefits and inherent value in your client's service, your ideas and yourself.

How to level up: master the craft of writing

My ex-boyfriend was a feisty, switched on, motor biking, wordsmith. He was paid to write. Isn’t that a sexy job?

How to level up: master the craft of writing
Benefits for loving the craft of writing
You get paid more.
Seriously you will!
You’re able to rationalise, point out the benefits and inherent value in your client's service, your ideas and yourself.
You create a greater depth of understanding and reveal more of your thought process.
You debunk the illusion of “invisible time” clients feel they’re paying for.
You’re more likely to start a blog, interesting channel or venture with words in your toolkit.
You’re taken more seriously.
You’re taken more funnily. (Who doesn’t love a raconteur?)
Why is writing powerful?
You’re not just creating an aesthetic.

My ex-boyfriend was a feisty, switched on, motor biking, wordsmith. He was paid to write. Isn’t that a sexy job?

In many of the studios I’ve worked in - it’s been the frequent thread - the writers have grabbed my attention. Quick, insightful, influential and funny. I’ve often wondered about this.

How does this help designers? Find yourself a killer creative partnership? Yeh sometimes. But there’s nothing more perplexing than seeing a kick ass portfolio and then meeting the artist behind said imagery… and they’re not quite as in their stride when it comes to the words business.

I’d had a gnaw-grindingly micro-managed day at work, and vented it out, to my ex. His response, “The trouble is darling, designers are sometimes treated as the wrist.” 🤙🤙

THE WRIST?

What the…? Suddenly, 101, “can you make it bigger?” conversations with ‘marketing execs’ over the years made a lot more sense. 

“This is down to a words game innit?” “You betcha baby.”

I can’t abide power plays in work, or having to verbalise your way into a popularity streak. That vibe just isn't me. But man, when I got the word-y wake up call - I saw a level of prowess and respect copywriters often commanded with clients. It got me thinking - I want a slice of that action. Every designer needs to be able to understand and articulate their design choices. And beyond that skill - being able to reflect and write about your ideas, micro copy on a button, a strong bio or a difficult email, will set you apart.

I thought the starting point might be understanding persuasion.. But thankfully it turned into a hunt for writing that serves well. What’s written, then rigorously honed down, so that the moment of clarity for someone else comes in at nano-seconds. That’s an act of service, rather than coercion. 

People who’ve helped me level up as a writer:

Chris Do (will challenge you to see yourself as a strategist, not a designer)

Seth Goldin (the Daddy of influence and permission marketing)

Ray Edwards (a master of copywriting that creates action)

Steven Barlett (phenomenal at using sparse language to open up other people’s stories)

Paul Boag (the original UX evangelist - words, experience and function are connected)

My ex-boyfriend was a feisty, switched on, motor biking, wordsmith. He was paid to write. Isn’t that a sexy job?

In many of the studios I’ve worked in - it’s been the frequent thread - the writers have grabbed my attention. Quick, insightful, influential and funny. I’ve often wondered about this.

How does this help designers? Find yourself a killer creative partnership? Yeh sometimes. But there’s nothing more perplexing than seeing a kick ass portfolio and then meeting the artist behind said imagery… and they’re not quite as in their stride when it comes to the words business.

I’d had a gnaw-grindingly micro-managed day at work, and vented it out, to my ex. His response, “The trouble is darling, designers are sometimes treated as the wrist.” 🤙🤙

THE WRIST?

What the…? Suddenly, 101, “can you make it bigger?” conversations with ‘marketing execs’ over the years made a lot more sense. 

“This is down to a words game innit?” “You betcha baby.”

I can’t abide power plays in work, or having to verbalise your way into a popularity streak. That vibe just isn't me. But man, when I got the word-y wake up call - I saw a level of prowess and respect copywriters often commanded with clients. It got me thinking - I want a slice of that action. Every designer needs to be able to understand and articulate their design choices. And beyond that skill - being able to reflect and write about your ideas, micro copy on a button, a strong bio or a difficult email, will set you apart.

I thought the starting point might be understanding persuasion.. But thankfully it turned into a hunt for writing that serves well. What’s written, then rigorously honed down, so that the moment of clarity for someone else comes in at nano-seconds. That’s an act of service, rather than coercion. 

People who’ve helped me level up as a writer:

Chris Do (will challenge you to see yourself as a strategist, not a designer)

Seth Goldin (the Daddy of influence and permission marketing)

Ray Edwards (a master of copywriting that creates action)

Steven Barlett (phenomenal at using sparse language to open up other people’s stories)

Paul Boag (the original UX evangelist - words, experience and function are connected)

How to level up: master the craft of writing
Benefits for loving the craft of writing
You get paid more.
Seriously you will!
You’re able to rationalise, point out the benefits and inherent value in your client's service, your ideas and yourself.
You create a greater depth of understanding and reveal more of your thought process.
You debunk the illusion of “invisible time” clients feel they’re paying for.
You’re more likely to start a blog, interesting channel or venture with words in your toolkit.
You’re taken more seriously.
You’re taken more funnily. (Who doesn’t love a raconteur?)
Why is writing powerful?
You’re not just creating an aesthetic.

My ex-boyfriend was a feisty, switched on, motor biking, wordsmith. He was paid to write. Isn’t that a sexy job?

In many of the studios I’ve worked in - it’s been the frequent thread - the writers have grabbed my attention. Quick, insightful, influential and funny. I’ve often wondered about this.

How does this help designers? Find yourself a killer creative partnership? Yeh sometimes. But there’s nothing more perplexing than seeing a kick ass portfolio and then meeting the artist behind said imagery… and they’re not quite as in their stride when it comes to the words business.

I’d had a gnaw-grindingly micro-managed day at work, and vented it out, to my ex. His response, “The trouble is darling, designers are sometimes treated as the wrist.” 🤙🤙

THE WRIST?

What the…? Suddenly, 101, “can you make it bigger?” conversations with ‘marketing execs’ over the years made a lot more sense. 

“This is down to a words game innit?” “You betcha baby.”

I can’t abide power plays in work, or having to verbalise your way into a popularity streak. That vibe just isn't me. But man, when I got the word-y wake up call - I saw a level of prowess and respect copywriters often commanded with clients. It got me thinking - I want a slice of that action. Every designer needs to be able to understand and articulate their design choices. And beyond that skill - being able to reflect and write about your ideas, micro copy on a button, a strong bio or a difficult email, will set you apart.

I thought the starting point might be understanding persuasion.. But thankfully it turned into a hunt for writing that serves well. What’s written, then rigorously honed down, so that the moment of clarity for someone else comes in at nano-seconds. That’s an act of service, rather than coercion. 

People who’ve helped me level up as a writer:

Chris Do (will challenge you to see yourself as a strategist, not a designer)

Seth Goldin (the Daddy of influence and permission marketing)

Ray Edwards (a master of copywriting that creates action)

Steven Barlett (phenomenal at using sparse language to open up other people’s stories)

Paul Boag (the original UX evangelist - words, experience and function are connected)

No items found.
You get paid more. You’re able to rationalise, point out the benefits and inherent value in your client's service, your ideas and yourself.

My ex-boyfriend was a feisty, switched on, motor biking, wordsmith. He was paid to write. Isn’t that a sexy job?

In many of the studios I’ve worked in - it’s been the frequent thread - the writers have grabbed my attention. Quick, insightful, influential and funny. I’ve often wondered about this.

How does this help designers? Find yourself a killer creative partnership? Yeh sometimes. But there’s nothing more perplexing than seeing a kick ass portfolio and then meeting the artist behind said imagery… and they’re not quite as in their stride when it comes to the words business.

I’d had a gnaw-grindingly micro-managed day at work, and vented it out, to my ex. His response, “The trouble is darling, designers are sometimes treated as the wrist.” 🤙🤙

THE WRIST?

What the…? Suddenly, 101, “can you make it bigger?” conversations with ‘marketing execs’ over the years made a lot more sense. 

“This is down to a words game innit?” “You betcha baby.”

I can’t abide power plays in work, or having to verbalise your way into a popularity streak. That vibe just isn't me. But man, when I got the word-y wake up call - I saw a level of prowess and respect copywriters often commanded with clients. It got me thinking - I want a slice of that action. Every designer needs to be able to understand and articulate their design choices. And beyond that skill - being able to reflect and write about your ideas, micro copy on a button, a strong bio or a difficult email, will set you apart.

I thought the starting point might be understanding persuasion.. But thankfully it turned into a hunt for writing that serves well. What’s written, then rigorously honed down, so that the moment of clarity for someone else comes in at nano-seconds. That’s an act of service, rather than coercion. 

People who’ve helped me level up as a writer:

Chris Do (will challenge you to see yourself as a strategist, not a designer)

Seth Goldin (the Daddy of influence and permission marketing)

Ray Edwards (a master of copywriting that creates action)

Steven Barlett (phenomenal at using sparse language to open up other people’s stories)

Paul Boag (the original UX evangelist - words, experience and function are connected)

You get paid more. You’re able to rationalise, point out the benefits and inherent value in your client's service, your ideas and yourself.

How to level up: master the craft of writing

My ex-boyfriend was a feisty, switched on, motor biking, wordsmith. He was paid to write. Isn’t that a sexy job?

My ex-boyfriend was a feisty, switched on, motor biking, wordsmith. He was paid to write. Isn’t that a sexy job?

In many of the studios I’ve worked in - it’s been the frequent thread - the writers have grabbed my attention. Quick, insightful, influential and funny. I’ve often wondered about this.

How does this help designers? Find yourself a killer creative partnership? Yeh sometimes. But there’s nothing more perplexing than seeing a kick ass portfolio and then meeting the artist behind said imagery… and they’re not quite as in their stride when it comes to the words business.

I’d had a gnaw-grindingly micro-managed day at work, and vented it out, to my ex. His response, “The trouble is darling, designers are sometimes treated as the wrist.” 🤙🤙

THE WRIST?

What the…? Suddenly, 101, “can you make it bigger?” conversations with ‘marketing execs’ over the years made a lot more sense. 

“This is down to a words game innit?” “You betcha baby.”

I can’t abide power plays in work, or having to verbalise your way into a popularity streak. That vibe just isn't me. But man, when I got the word-y wake up call - I saw a level of prowess and respect copywriters often commanded with clients. It got me thinking - I want a slice of that action. Every designer needs to be able to understand and articulate their design choices. And beyond that skill - being able to reflect and write about your ideas, micro copy on a button, a strong bio or a difficult email, will set you apart.

I thought the starting point might be understanding persuasion.. But thankfully it turned into a hunt for writing that serves well. What’s written, then rigorously honed down, so that the moment of clarity for someone else comes in at nano-seconds. That’s an act of service, rather than coercion. 

People who’ve helped me level up as a writer:

Chris Do (will challenge you to see yourself as a strategist, not a designer)

Seth Goldin (the Daddy of influence and permission marketing)

Ray Edwards (a master of copywriting that creates action)

Steven Barlett (phenomenal at using sparse language to open up other people’s stories)

Paul Boag (the original UX evangelist - words, experience and function are connected)

You get paid more. You’re able to rationalise, point out the benefits and inherent value in your client's service, your ideas and yourself.

My ex-boyfriend was a feisty, switched on, motor biking, wordsmith. He was paid to write. Isn’t that a sexy job?

In many of the studios I’ve worked in - it’s been the frequent thread - the writers have grabbed my attention. Quick, insightful, influential and funny. I’ve often wondered about this.

How does this help designers? Find yourself a killer creative partnership? Yeh sometimes. But there’s nothing more perplexing than seeing a kick ass portfolio and then meeting the artist behind said imagery… and they’re not quite as in their stride when it comes to the words business.

I’d had a gnaw-grindingly micro-managed day at work, and vented it out, to my ex. His response, “The trouble is darling, designers are sometimes treated as the wrist.” 🤙🤙

THE WRIST?

What the…? Suddenly, 101, “can you make it bigger?” conversations with ‘marketing execs’ over the years made a lot more sense. 

“This is down to a words game innit?” “You betcha baby.”

I can’t abide power plays in work, or having to verbalise your way into a popularity streak. That vibe just isn't me. But man, when I got the word-y wake up call - I saw a level of prowess and respect copywriters often commanded with clients. It got me thinking - I want a slice of that action. Every designer needs to be able to understand and articulate their design choices. And beyond that skill - being able to reflect and write about your ideas, micro copy on a button, a strong bio or a difficult email, will set you apart.

I thought the starting point might be understanding persuasion.. But thankfully it turned into a hunt for writing that serves well. What’s written, then rigorously honed down, so that the moment of clarity for someone else comes in at nano-seconds. That’s an act of service, rather than coercion. 

People who’ve helped me level up as a writer:

Chris Do (will challenge you to see yourself as a strategist, not a designer)

Seth Goldin (the Daddy of influence and permission marketing)

Ray Edwards (a master of copywriting that creates action)

Steven Barlett (phenomenal at using sparse language to open up other people’s stories)

Paul Boag (the original UX evangelist - words, experience and function are connected)

How to level up: master the craft of writing
Benefits for loving the craft of writing
You get paid more.
Seriously you will!
You’re able to rationalise, point out the benefits and inherent value in your client's service, your ideas and yourself.
You create a greater depth of understanding and reveal more of your thought process.
You debunk the illusion of “invisible time” clients feel they’re paying for.
You’re more likely to start a blog, interesting channel or venture with words in your toolkit.
You’re taken more seriously.
You’re taken more funnily. (Who doesn’t love a raconteur?)
Why is writing powerful?
You’re not just creating an aesthetic.

You get paid more. You’re able to rationalise, point out the benefits and inherent value in your client's service, your ideas and yourself.

How to level up: master the craft of writing

My ex-boyfriend was a feisty, switched on, motor biking, wordsmith. He was paid to write. Isn’t that a sexy job?

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No items found.

My ex-boyfriend was a feisty, switched on, motor biking, wordsmith. He was paid to write. Isn’t that a sexy job?

In many of the studios I’ve worked in - it’s been the frequent thread - the writers have grabbed my attention. Quick, insightful, influential and funny. I’ve often wondered about this.

How does this help designers? Find yourself a killer creative partnership? Yeh sometimes. But there’s nothing more perplexing than seeing a kick ass portfolio and then meeting the artist behind said imagery… and they’re not quite as in their stride when it comes to the words business.

I’d had a gnaw-grindingly micro-managed day at work, and vented it out, to my ex. His response, “The trouble is darling, designers are sometimes treated as the wrist.” 🤙🤙

THE WRIST?

What the…? Suddenly, 101, “can you make it bigger?” conversations with ‘marketing execs’ over the years made a lot more sense. 

“This is down to a words game innit?” “You betcha baby.”

I can’t abide power plays in work, or having to verbalise your way into a popularity streak. That vibe just isn't me. But man, when I got the word-y wake up call - I saw a level of prowess and respect copywriters often commanded with clients. It got me thinking - I want a slice of that action. Every designer needs to be able to understand and articulate their design choices. And beyond that skill - being able to reflect and write about your ideas, micro copy on a button, a strong bio or a difficult email, will set you apart.

I thought the starting point might be understanding persuasion.. But thankfully it turned into a hunt for writing that serves well. What’s written, then rigorously honed down, so that the moment of clarity for someone else comes in at nano-seconds. That’s an act of service, rather than coercion. 

People who’ve helped me level up as a writer:

Chris Do (will challenge you to see yourself as a strategist, not a designer)

Seth Goldin (the Daddy of influence and permission marketing)

Ray Edwards (a master of copywriting that creates action)

Steven Barlett (phenomenal at using sparse language to open up other people’s stories)

Paul Boag (the original UX evangelist - words, experience and function are connected)

Sticky Wrapper & any images with a fade in...

Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consectetur adipiscing elit. Suspendisse varius enim in eros elementum tristique. Duis cursus, mi quis viverra ornare, eros dolor interdum nulla, ut commodo diam libero vitae erat. Aenean faucibus nibh et justo cursus id rutrum lorem imperdiet. Nunc ut sem vitae risus tristique posuere.

My ex-boyfriend was a feisty, switched on, motor biking, wordsmith. He was paid to write. Isn’t that a sexy job?

In many of the studios I’ve worked in - it’s been the frequent thread - the writers have grabbed my attention. Quick, insightful, influential and funny. I’ve often wondered about this.

How does this help designers? Find yourself a killer creative partnership? Yeh sometimes. But there’s nothing more perplexing than seeing a kick ass portfolio and then meeting the artist behind said imagery… and they’re not quite as in their stride when it comes to the words business.

I’d had a gnaw-grindingly micro-managed day at work, and vented it out, to my ex. His response, “The trouble is darling, designers are sometimes treated as the wrist.” 🤙🤙

THE WRIST?

What the…? Suddenly, 101, “can you make it bigger?” conversations with ‘marketing execs’ over the years made a lot more sense. 

“This is down to a words game innit?” “You betcha baby.”

I can’t abide power plays in work, or having to verbalise your way into a popularity streak. That vibe just isn't me. But man, when I got the word-y wake up call - I saw a level of prowess and respect copywriters often commanded with clients. It got me thinking - I want a slice of that action. Every designer needs to be able to understand and articulate their design choices. And beyond that skill - being able to reflect and write about your ideas, micro copy on a button, a strong bio or a difficult email, will set you apart.

I thought the starting point might be understanding persuasion.. But thankfully it turned into a hunt for writing that serves well. What’s written, then rigorously honed down, so that the moment of clarity for someone else comes in at nano-seconds. That’s an act of service, rather than coercion. 

People who’ve helped me level up as a writer:

Chris Do (will challenge you to see yourself as a strategist, not a designer)

Seth Goldin (the Daddy of influence and permission marketing)

Ray Edwards (a master of copywriting that creates action)

Steven Barlett (phenomenal at using sparse language to open up other people’s stories)

Paul Boag (the original UX evangelist - words, experience and function are connected)

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PS. You’re not the hero… You’re the guide.
Comparing myself
☝🏽